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Re: [PATCH, Fortran] Refer consistently to "GNU Fortran" in the manual


Janne Blomqvist wrote:
On Sun, Oct 01, 2006 at 09:49:47PM -0700, Brooks Moses wrote:
Brooks Moses wrote:
2006-10-01 Brooks Moses <bmoses@stanford.edu>

	* gfortran.texi: Consistently refer to the compiler as "GNU
	Fortran".
	* intrinsic.texi: Ditto.
	* invoke.texi: Ditto.

Reading through the patch, you missed the following:


@@ -297,24 +297,24 @@
 GNU Fortran 95 has a strict separation between the

i.e. s/GNU Fortran 95/GNU Fortran/

With that change, Ok for trunk.

Thanks! I checked, and found that I had misseda few other instances of "GNU Fortran 95" as well. (Including the title of the manual!)


I don't have commit privileges, so could someone please commit this for me? I've attached a revised version of the patch, with Janne's suggested change and the other similar ones.

- Brooks
Index: gfortran.texi
===================================================================
--- gfortran.texi	(revision 117359)
+++ gfortran.texi	(working copy)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
 
 @include gcc-common.texi
 
-@settitle The GNU Fortran 95 Compiler
+@settitle The GNU Fortran Compiler
 
 @c Create a separate index for command line options
 @defcodeindex op
@@ -63,10 +63,10 @@
 @ifinfo
 @dircategory Software development
 @direntry
-* gfortran: (gfortran).                  The GNU Fortran 95 Compiler.
+* gfortran: (gfortran).                  The GNU Fortran Compiler.
 @end direntry
 This file documents the use and the internals of
-the GNU Fortran 95 compiler, (@command{gfortran}).
+the GNU Fortran compiler, (@command{gfortran}).
 
 Published by the Free Software Foundation
 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor
@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@
 
 @setchapternewpage odd
 @titlepage
-@title Using GNU Fortran 95
+@title Using GNU Fortran
 @sp 2
 @center The gfortran team
 @page
@@ -103,13 +103,13 @@
 @cindex Introduction
 
 This manual documents the use of @command{gfortran}, 
-the GNU Fortran 95 compiler. You can find in this manual how to invoke
+the GNU Fortran compiler. You can find in this manual how to invoke
 @command{gfortran}, as well as its features and incompatibilities.
 
 @ifset DEVELOPMENT
 @emph{Warning:} This document, and the compiler it describes, are still
 under development.  While efforts are made to keep it up-to-date, it might
-not accurately reflect the status of the most recent @command{gfortran}.
+not accurately reflect the status of the most recent GNU Fortran compiler.
 @end ifset
 
 @comment
@@ -118,16 +118,16 @@
 @comment  better formatting.
 @comment
 @menu
-* Getting Started::      What you should know about @command{gfortran}.
-* GFORTRAN and GCC::     You can compile Fortran, C, or other programs.
-* GFORTRAN and G77::     Why we chose to start from scratch.
-* Invoking GFORTRAN::    Command options supported by @command{gfortran}.
-* Project Status::       Status of @command{gfortran}, roadmap, proposed extensions.
+* Getting Started::      What you should know about GNU Fortran.
+* GNU Fortran and GCC::  You can compile Fortran, C, or other programs.
+* GNU Fortran and G77::  Why we chose to start from scratch.
+* Invoking GNU Fortran:: Command options supported by @command{gfortran}.
+* Project Status::       Status of GNU Fortran, roadmap, proposed extensions.
 * Contributing::         How you can help.
-* Standards::	         Standards supported by @command{gfortran}
+* Standards::	         Standards supported by GNU Fortran.
 * Runtime::              Influencing runtime behavior with environment variables.
-* Extensions::           Language extensions implemented by @command{gfortran}
-* Intrinsic Procedures:: Intrinsic procedures supported by @command{gfortran}
+* Extensions::           Language extensions implemented by GNU Fortran.
+* Intrinsic Procedures:: Intrinsic procedures supported by GNU Fortran.
 * Copying::              GNU General Public License says
                          how you can copy and share GNU Fortran.
 * GNU Free Documentation License::
@@ -145,16 +145,16 @@
 @node Getting Started
 @chapter Getting Started
 
-Gfortran is the GNU Fortran 95 compiler front end,
+The GNU Fortran compiler front end was
 designed initially as a free replacement for,
 or alternative to, the unix @command{f95} command;
 @command{gfortran} is the command you'll use to invoke the compiler.
 
-Gfortran is still in an early state of development.
-@command{gfortran} can generate code for most constructs and expressions,
+The GNU Fortran compiler is still in an early state of development.
+It can generate code for most constructs and expressions,
 but much work remains to be done.
 
-When @command{gfortran} is finished,
+When the GNU Fortran compiler is finished,
 it will do everything you expect from any decent compiler: 
 
 @itemize @bullet
@@ -210,7 +210,7 @@
 and @dfn{linked} to the user program. 
 @end itemize
 
-Gfortran consists of several components:
+The GNU Fortran compiler consists of several components:
 
 @itemize @bullet
 @item
@@ -228,7 +228,7 @@
 which also might be installed as the
 system's @command{f95} command.
 @command{gfortran} is just another driver program,
-but specifically for the Fortran 95 compiler only.
+but specifically for the Fortran compiler only.
 The difference with @command{gcc} is that @command{gfortran}
 will automatically link the correct libraries to your program.
 
@@ -245,7 +245,7 @@
 
 @item
 The Fortran compiler itself, (@command{f951}).
-This is the gfortran parser and code generator,
+This is the GNU Fortran parser and code generator,
 linked to and interfaced with the GCC backend library.
 @command{f951} ``translates'' the source code to
 assembler code.  You would typically not use this
@@ -257,11 +257,11 @@
 
 
 @c ---------------------------------------------------------------------
-@c GFORTRAN and GCC
+@c GNU Fortran and GCC
 @c ---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 @node GFORTRAN and GCC
-@chapter GFORTRAN and GCC
+@chapter GNU Fortran and GCC
 @cindex GNU Compiler Collection
 
 GCC used to be the GNU ``C'' Compiler,
@@ -294,27 +294,27 @@
 
 Different phases in this translation process can be,
 and in fact @emph{are} merged in many compiler front ends.
-GNU Fortran 95 has a strict separation between the
+GNU Fortran has a strict separation between the
 parser and code generator.
 
-The goal of the gfortran project is to build a new front end for GCC.
+The goal of the GNU Fortran project is to build a new front end for GCC.
 Specifically, a Fortran 95 front end.
-In a non-gfortran installation,
-@command{gcc} will not be able to compile Fortran 95 source code
+In a non-@command{gfortran} installation,
+@command{gcc} will not be able to compile Fortran source code
 (only the ``C'' front end has to be compiled if you want to build GCC,
 all other languages are optional).
-If you build GCC with gfortran, @command{gcc} will recognize
-@file{.f/.f90/.f95} source files and accepts Fortran 95 specific
+If you build GCC with @command{gfortran}, @command{gcc} will recognize
+@file{.f/.f90/.f95} source files and accepts Fortran specific
 command line options.
 
 
 
 @c ---------------------------------------------------------------------
-@c GFORTRAN and G77
+@c GNU Fortran and G77
 @c ---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 @node GFORTRAN and G77
-@chapter GFORTRAN and G77
+@chapter GNU Fortran and G77
 @cindex Fortran 77
 @cindex G77
 
@@ -359,10 +359,10 @@
 @chapter Project Status
 
 @quotation
-As soon as gfortran can parse all of the statements correctly,
+As soon as @command{gfortran} can parse all of the statements correctly,
 it will be in the ``larva'' state.
 When we generate code, the ``puppa'' state.
-When gfortran is done,
+When @command{gfortran} is done,
 we'll see if it will be a beautiful butterfly,
 or just a big bug....
 
@@ -374,7 +374,8 @@
 (even though Andy had already been working on it for a while,
 of course).
 
-Gfortran is currently reaching the stage where is is able to compile real
+The GNU Fortran compiler is currently reaching the stage where is is able to
+compile real
 world programs.  However it is still under development and has many rough
 edges.
 
@@ -389,19 +390,19 @@
 
 @table @emph
 @item Front end
-This is the part of gfortran which parses a source file, verifies that it
-is valid Fortran 95, performs compile time replacement of constants
+This is the part of the GNU Fortran compiler which parses a source file, verifies that it
+is valid Fortran, performs compile time replacement of constants
 (PARAMETER variables) and reads and generate module files. This is
 almost complete. Every Fortran 95 source should be accepted, and most
 none-Fortran 95 source should be rejected. If you find a source file where
 this is not true, please tell us. You can use the -fsyntax-only switch to
-make gfortran quit after running the front end, effectively reducing it to
+make @command{gfortran} quit after running the front end, effectively reducing it to
 a syntax checker.
 
 @item Middle end interface
-These are the parts of gfortran that take the parse tree generated by the
+These are the parts of GNU Fortran that take the parse tree generated by the
 front end and translate it to the GENERIC form required by the GCC back
-end. Work is ongoing in these parts of gfortran, but a large part has
+end. Work is ongoing in these parts of GNU Fortran, but a large part has
 already been completed.
 @end table
 
@@ -429,7 +430,7 @@
 @node Proposed Extensions
 @section Proposed Extensions
 
-Here's a list of proposed extensions for @command{gfortran}, in no particular
+Here's a list of proposed extensions for the GNU Fortran compiler, in no particular
 order.  Most of these are necessary to be fully compatible with
 existing Fortran compilers, but they are not part of the official
 J3 Fortran 95 standard.
@@ -601,7 +602,7 @@
 
 This environment variable controls where scratch files are
 created.  If this environment variable is missing,
-gfortran searches for the environment variable @env{TMP}.  If
+GNU Fortran searches for the environment variable @env{TMP}.  If
 this is also missing, the default is @file{/tmp}.
 
 @node GFORTRAN_UNBUFFERED_ALL
@@ -648,7 +649,7 @@
 @smallexample
 $ GFORTRAN_LIST_SEPARATOR='  ,  ' ./a.out
 @end smallexample
-when @code{a.out} is the gfortran program that you want to run.
+when @code{a.out} is the compiled Fortran program that you want to run.
 Default is a single space.
 
 @node GFORTRAN_CONVERT_UNIT
@@ -726,11 +727,11 @@
 @chapter Extensions
 @cindex Extension
 
-@command{gfortran} implements a number of extensions over standard
+GNU Fortran implements a number of extensions over standard
 Fortran. This chapter contains information on their syntax and
-meaning.  There are currently two categories of @command{gfortran}
+meaning.  There are currently two categories of GNU Fortran
 extensions, those that provide functionality beyond that provided
-by any standard, and those that are supported by @command{gfortran}
+by any standard, and those that are supported by GNU Fortran
 purely for backward compatibility with legacy compilers.  By default,
 @option{-std=gnu} allows the compiler to accept both types of
 extensions, but to warn about the use of the latter.  Specifying
@@ -759,7 +760,7 @@
 @section Old-style kind specifications
 @cindex Kind specifications
 
-@command{gfortran} allows old-style kind specifications in
+GNU Fortran allows old-style kind specifications in
 declarations. These look like:
 @smallexample
       TYPESPEC*k x,y,z
@@ -776,7 +777,7 @@
 @section Old-style variable initialization
 @cindex Initialization
 
-@command{gfortran} allows old-style initialization of variables of the
+GNU Fortran allows old-style initialization of variables of the
 form:
 @smallexample
       INTEGER*4 i/1/,j/2/
@@ -808,7 +809,7 @@
 @section Extensions to namelist
 @cindex Namelist
 
-@command{gfortran} fully supports the Fortran 95 standard for namelist I/O
+GNU Fortran fully supports the Fortran 95 standard for namelist I/O
 including array qualifiers, substrings and fully qualified derived types.
 The output from a namelist write is compatible with namelist read.  The
 output has all names in upper case and indentation to column 1 after the
@@ -874,7 +875,7 @@
 @section X format descriptor
 @cindex X format descriptor
 
-To support legacy codes, @command{gfortran} permits the count field
+To support legacy codes, GNU Fortran permits the count field
 of the X edit descriptor in FORMAT statements to be omitted.  When
 omitted, the count is implicitly assumed to be one.
 
@@ -887,7 +888,7 @@
 @section Commas in FORMAT specifications
 @cindex Commas in FORMAT specifications
 
-To support legacy codes, @command{gfortran} allows the comma separator
+To support legacy codes, GNU Fortran allows the comma separator
 to be omitted immediately before and after character string edit
 descriptors in FORMAT statements.
 
@@ -901,7 +902,7 @@
 @section Missing period in FORMAT specifications
 @cindex Missing period in FORMAT specifications
 
-To support legacy codes, @command{gfortran} allows missing periods in format
+To support legacy codes, GNU Fortran allows missing periods in format
 specifications if and only if -std=legacy is given on the command line.  This
 is considered non-conforming code and is discouraged.
 
@@ -915,7 +916,7 @@
 @section I/O item lists
 @cindex I/O item lists
 
-To support legacy codes, @command{gfortran} allows the input item list
+To support legacy codes, GNU Fortran allows the input item list
 of the READ statement, and the output item lists of the WRITE and PRINT
 statements to start with a comma.
 
@@ -923,14 +924,14 @@
 @section Hexadecimal constants
 @cindex Hexadecimal constants
 
-As a GNU extension, @command{gfortran} allows hexadecimal constants to
+As an extension, GNU Fortran allows hexadecimal constants to
 be specified using the X prefix, in addition to the standard Z prefix.
 BOZ literal constants can also be specified by adding a suffix to the string.
 For example, @code{Z'ABC'} and @code{'ABC'Z} are the same constant.
 
 The Fortran standard restricts the appearance of a BOZ literal constant to
 the @code{DATA} statement, and it is expected to be assigned to an 
-@code{INTEGER} variable.  @command{gfortran} permits a BOZ to appear
+@code{INTEGER} variable.  GNU Fortran permits a BOZ literal to appear
 in any initialization expression as well as assignment statements.
 
 Attempts to use a BOZ literal constant to do a bitwise initialization of a
@@ -951,14 +952,14 @@
 @section Real array indices
 @cindex Real array indices
 
-As a GNU extension, @command{gfortran} allows arrays to be indexed using
+As an extension, GNU Fortran allows arrays to be indexed using
 real types, whose values are implicitly converted to integers.
 
 @node Unary operators
 @section Unary operators
 @cindex Unary operators
 
-As a GNU extension, @command{gfortran} allows unary plus and unary
+As an extension, GNU Fortran allows unary plus and unary
 minus operators to appear as the second operand of binary arithmetic
 operators without the need for parenthesis.
 
@@ -970,8 +971,8 @@
 @section Implicitly interconvert LOGICAL and INTEGER
 @cindex Implicitly interconvert LOGICAL and INTEGER
 
-As a GNU extension for backwards compatibility with other compilers,
-@command{gfortran} allows the implicit conversion of LOGICALs to INTEGERs
+As an extension for backwards compatibility with other compilers,
+GNU Fortran allows the implicit conversion of LOGICALs to INTEGERs
 and vice versa.  When converting from a LOGICAL to an INTEGER, the numeric
 value of @code{.FALSE.} is zero, and that of @code{.TRUE.} is one.  When
 converting from INTEGER to LOGICAL, the value zero is interpreted as
@@ -991,7 +992,7 @@
 constant indicating the number of characters in the string. Hollerith constants
 are stored as byte strings, one character per byte.
 
-@command{gfortran} supports Hollerith constants. They can be used as the right
+GNU Fortran supports Hollerith constants. They can be used as the right
 hands in the @code{DATA} statement and @code{ASSIGN} statement, also as the
 arguments. The left hands can be of Integer, Real, Complex and Logical type.
 The constant will be padded or truncated to fit the size of left hand.
@@ -1105,7 +1106,7 @@
 which it shares storage is not used.  Code that violates these rules
 may not run as the user intends.  This is not a bug in the optimizer;
 any code that violates the aliasing rules is illegal.  (Note that this
-is not unique to gfortran; any Fortran compiler that supports Cray
+is not unique to GNU Fortran; any Fortran compiler that supports Cray
 pointers will ``incorrectly'' optimize code with illegal aliasing.)
 
 There are a number of restrictions on the attributes that can be
@@ -1142,7 +1143,7 @@
 @section CONVERT specifier
 @cindex CONVERT specifier
 
-gfortran allows the conversion of unformatted data between little-
+GNU Fortran allows the conversion of unformatted data between little-
 and big-endian representation to facilitate moving of data
 between different systems.  The conversion can be indicated with
 the @code{CONVERT} specifier on the @code{OPEN} statement.
@@ -1173,8 +1174,8 @@
 @code{INTEGER} values of all supported kinds and for @code{REAL}
 on IEEE systems of kinds 4 and 8.  Conversion between different
 ``extended double'' types on different architectures such as
-m68k and x86_64, which gfortran
-supports as @code{REAL(KIND=10)} will probably not work.
+m68k and x86_64, which GNU Fortran
+supports as @code{REAL(KIND=10)}, will probably not work.
 
 @emph{Note that the values specified via the GFORTRAN_CONVERT_UNIT
 environment variable will override the CONVERT specifier in the
@@ -1190,8 +1191,8 @@
 @section OpenMP
 @cindex OpenMP
 
-gfortran attempts to be OpenMP Application Program Interface v2.5
-compatible when invoked with the @code{-fopenmp} option.  gfortran
+GNU Fortran attempts to be OpenMP Application Program Interface v2.5
+compatible when invoked with the @code{-fopenmp} option.  GNU Fortran
 then generates parallelized code according to the OpenMP directives
 used in the source.  The OpenMP Fortran runtime library
 routines are provided both in a form of Fortran 90 module named
@@ -1219,12 +1220,12 @@
 We're always in need of more people helping out with ideas
 and comments, writing documentation and contributing code.
 
-If you want to contribute to GNU Fortran 95,
+If you want to contribute to GNU Fortran,
 have a look at the long lists of projects you can take on.
 Some of these projects are small,
 some of them are large;
 some are completely orthogonal to the rest of what is
-happening on @command{gfortran},
+happening on GNU Fortran,
 but others are ``mainstream'' projects in need of enthusiastic hackers.
 All of these projects are important!
 We'll eventually get around to the things here,
@@ -1237,7 +1238,7 @@
 
 
 @node Contributors
-@section Contributors to GNU Fortran 95
+@section Contributors to GNU Fortran
 @cindex Contributors
 @cindex Credits
 @cindex Authors
@@ -1247,7 +1248,7 @@
 Most of the interface with GCC was written by @emph{Paul Brook}.
 
 The following individuals have contributed code and/or
-ideas and significant help to the gfortran project
+ideas and significant help to the GNU Fortran project
 (in no particular order):
 
 @itemize @minus
@@ -1282,7 +1283,7 @@
 The following people have contributed bug reports,
 smaller or larger patches,
 and much needed feedback and encouragement for the
-@command{gfortran} project: 
+GNU Fortran project: 
 
 @itemize @minus
 @item Erik Schnetter
@@ -1291,7 +1292,7 @@
 @end itemize
 
 Many other individuals have helped debug,
-test and improve @command{gfortran} over the past few years,
+test and improve the GNU Fortran compiler over the past few years,
 and we welcome you to do the same!
 If you already have done so,
 and you would like to see your name listed in the
@@ -1335,7 +1336,7 @@
 @chapter Standards
 @cindex Standards
 
-The GNU Fortran 95 Compiler aims to be a conforming implementation of
+The GNU Fortran compiler aims to be a conforming implementation of
 ISO/IEC 1539:1997 (Fortran 95).
 
 In the future it may also support other variants of and extensions to
@@ -1349,7 +1350,7 @@
 @node Fortran 2003 status
 @section Fortran 2003 status
 
-Although @command{gfortran} focuses on implementing the Fortran 95
+Although GNU Fortran focuses on implementing the Fortran 95
 standard for the time being, a few Fortran 2003 features are currently
 available.
 
Index: invoke.texi
===================================================================
--- invoke.texi	(revision 117359)
+++ invoke.texi	(working copy)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 @c Copyright (C) 2004, 2005, 2006
 @c Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-@c This is part of the GFORTRAN manual.   
+@c This is part of the GNU Fortran manual.   
 @c For copying conditions, see the file gfortran.texi.
 
 @ignore
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@
 @c man end
 @c Set file name and title for the man page.
 @setfilename gfortran
-@settitle GNU Fortran 95 compiler.
+@settitle GNU Fortran compiler.
 @c man begin SYNOPSIS
 gfortran [@option{-c}|@option{-S}|@option{-E}]
          [@option{-g}] [@option{-pg}] [@option{-O}@var{level}]
@@ -54,20 +54,20 @@
 @c man end
 @c man begin AUTHOR
 See the Info entry for @command{gfortran} for contributors to GCC and
-GFORTRAN@.
+GNU Fortran.
 @c man end
 @end ignore
 
 @node Invoking GFORTRAN
-@chapter GNU Fortran 95 Command Options
-@cindex GNU Fortran 95 command options
+@chapter GNU Fortran Command Options
+@cindex GNU Fortran command options
 @cindex command options
-@cindex options, GNU Fortran 95 command
+@cindex options, @command{gfortran} command
 
 @c man begin DESCRIPTION
 
 The @command{gfortran} command supports all the options supported by the
-@command{gcc} command.  Only options specific to gfortran are documented here.
+@command{gcc} command.  Only options specific to GNU Fortran are documented here.
 
 @xref{Invoking GCC,,GCC Command Options,gcc,Using the GNU Compiler
 Collection (GCC)}, for information
@@ -76,12 +76,12 @@
 
 @cindex options, negative forms
 @cindex negative forms of options
-All @command{gcc} and @command{gfortran} options
+All GCC and GNU Fortran options
 are accepted both by @command{gfortran} and by @command{gcc}
 (as well as any other drivers built at the same time,
 such as @command{g++}),
-since adding @command{gfortran} to the @command{gcc} distribution
-enables acceptance of @command{gfortran} options
+since adding GNU Fortran to the GCC distribution
+enables acceptance of GNU Fortran options
 by all of the relevant drivers.
 
 In some cases, options have positive and negative forms;
@@ -101,7 +101,7 @@
 * Runtime Options::     Influencing runtime behavior
 * Code Gen Options::    Specifying conventions for function calls, data layout
                         and register usage.
-* Environment Variables:: Env vars that affect GNU Fortran.
+* Environment Variables:: Env vars that affect @command{gfortran}.
 @end menu
 
 @node Option Summary
@@ -197,7 +197,7 @@
 Accept all of the intrinsic procedures provided in libgfortran 
 without regard to the setting of @option{-std}.  In particular, 
 this option can be quite useful with @option{-std=f95}.  Additionally,
-gfortran will ignore @option{-Wnonstd-intrinsics}.
+@command{gfortran} will ignore @option{-Wnonstd-intrinsics}.
 
 @cindex option, -fd-lines-as-code
 @cindex -fd-lines-as-code, option
@@ -315,7 +315,7 @@
 @cindex options, -frange-check
 @item -frange-check
 Enable range checking on results of simplification of constant expressions
-during compilation.  For example, by default, @command{gfortran} will give
+during compilation.  For example, by default, GNU Fortran will give
 an overflow error at compile time when simplifying @code{a = EXP(1000)}.
 With @samp{-fno-range-check}, no error will be given and the variable @code{a}
 will be assigned the value @code{+Infinity}.  Similarly,
@@ -366,12 +366,12 @@
 @cindex -pedantic option
 @cindex options, -pedantic
 @item -pedantic
-Issue warnings for uses of extensions to FORTRAN 95.
+Issue warnings for uses of extensions to Fortran 95.
 @option{-pedantic} also applies to C-language constructs where they
 occur in GNU Fortran source files, such as use of @samp{\e} in a
 character constant within a directive like @samp{#include}.
 
-Valid FORTRAN 95 programs should compile properly with or without
+Valid Fortran 95 programs should compile properly with or without
 this option.
 However, without this option, certain GNU extensions and traditional
 Fortran features are supported as well.
@@ -380,7 +380,7 @@
 Some users try to use @option{-pedantic} to check programs for conformance.
 They soon find that it does not do quite what they want---it finds some
 nonstandard practices, but not all.
-However, improvements to @command{gfortran} in this area are welcome.
+However, improvements to GNU Fortran in this area are welcome.
 
 This should be used in conjunction with -std=@var{std}.
 
@@ -438,7 +438,7 @@
 Warn about missing ampersand in continued character constants. The warning is
 given with @option{-Wampersand}, @option{-pedantic}, @option{-std=f95}, and
 @option{-std=f2003}. Note: With no ampersand given in a continued character
-constant, gfortran assumes continuation at the first non-comment,
+constant, GNU Fortran assumes continuation at the first non-comment,
 non-whitespace character after the ampersand that initiated the continuation.
 
 
@@ -522,7 +522,7 @@
 @cindex warnings, extra
 Turns on ``extra warnings'' and, if optimization is specified
 via @option{-O}, the @option{-Wuninitialized} option.
-(This might change in future versions of @command{gfortran}
+(This might change in future versions of GNU Fortran.)
 @end table
 
 @xref{Warning Options,,Options to Request or Suppress Warnings,
@@ -538,14 +538,14 @@
 @cindex debugging information options
 
 GNU Fortran has various special options that are used for debugging
-either your program or @command{gfortran}
+either your program or the GNU Fortran compiler.
 
 @table @gcctabopt
 @cindex -fdump-parse-tree option
 @cindex option, -fdump-parse-tree
 @item -fdump-parse-tree
 Output the internal parse tree before starting code generation.  Only
-really useful for debugging gfortran itself.
+really useful for debugging the GNU Fortran compiler itself.
 @end table
 
 @table @gcctabopt
@@ -576,7 +576,7 @@
 
 @cindex INCLUDE directive
 @cindex directive, INCLUDE
-These options affect how @command{gfortran} searches
+These options affect how GNU Fortran searches
 for files specified by the @code{INCLUDE} directive and where it searches
 for previously compiled modules.
 
@@ -626,7 +626,7 @@
 @section Influencing runtime behavior
 @cindex runtime, options
 
-These options affect the runtime behavior of @command{gfortran}.
+These options affect the runtime behavior of programs compiled with GNU Fortran.
 @table @gcctabopt
 @cindex -fconvert=@var{conversion} option
 @item -fconvert=@var{conversion}
@@ -723,18 +723,18 @@
 Do not transform names of entities specified in the Fortran
 source file by appending underscores to them.
 
-With @option{-funderscoring} in effect, @command{gfortran} appends one
+With @option{-funderscoring} in effect, GNU Fortran appends one
 underscore to external names with no underscores.  This is done to ensure
 compatibility with code produced by many UNIX Fortran compilers.
 
-@emph{Caution}: The default behavior of @command{gfortran} is
+@emph{Caution}: The default behavior of GNU Fortran is
 incompatible with @command{f2c} and @command{g77}, please use the
 @option{-ff2c} option if you want object files compiled with
-@option{gfortran} to be compatible with object code created with these
+GNU Fortran to be compatible with object code created with these
 tools.
 
 Use of @option{-fno-underscoring} is not recommended unless you are
-experimenting with issues such as integration of (GNU) Fortran into
+experimenting with issues such as integration of GNU Fortran into
 existing system environments (vis-a-vis existing libraries, tools, and
 so on).
 
@@ -761,13 +761,13 @@
 @end smallexample
 
 Use of @option{-fno-underscoring} allows direct specification of
-user-defined names while debugging and when interfacing @command{gfortran}
+user-defined names while debugging and when interfacing GNU Fortran
 code with other languages.
 
 Note that just because the names match does @emph{not} mean that the
-interface implemented by @command{gfortran} for an external name matches the
+interface implemented by GNU Fortran for an external name matches the
 interface implemented by some other language for that same name.
-That is, getting code produced by @command{gfortran} to link to code produced
+That is, getting code produced by GNU Fortran to link to code produced
 by some other compiler using this or any other method can be only a
 small part of the overall solution---getting the code generated by
 both compilers to agree on issues other than naming can require
@@ -781,7 +781,7 @@
 cases---they might occur at program run time, and show up only as
 buggy behavior at run time.
 
-In future versions of @command{gfortran} we hope to improve naming and linking
+In future versions of GNU Fortran we hope to improve naming and linking
 issues so that debugging always involves using the names as they appear
 in the source, even if the names as seen by the linker are mangled to
 prevent accidental linking between procedures with incompatible
@@ -797,10 +797,10 @@
 @cindex @command{f2c} calling convention
 @cindex @command{g77} calling convention
 @cindex libf2c calling convention
-By default, @command{gfortran} appends an underscore to external
-names.  If this option is used @command{gfortran} appends two
+By default, GNU Fortran appends an underscore to external
+names.  If this option is used GNU Fortran appends two
 underscores to names with underscores and one underscore to external names
-with no underscores.  (@command{gfortran} also appends two underscores to
+with no underscores.  GNU Fortran also appends two underscores to
 internal names with underscores to avoid naming collisions with external
 names.
 
@@ -838,21 +838,21 @@
 
 This option currently only affects local arrays declared with constant
 bounds, and may not apply to all character variables.
-Future versions of @command{gfortran} may improve this behavior.
+Future versions of GNU Fortran may improve this behavior.
 
 The default value for @var{n} is 32768.
 
 @cindex -fpack-derived
 @item -fpack-derived
 @cindex Structure packing
-This option tells gfortran to pack derived type members as closely as
+This option tells GNU Fortran to pack derived type members as closely as
 possible.  Code compiled with this option is likely to be incompatible
 with code compiled without this option, and may execute slower.
 
 @cindex -frepack-arrays option
 @item -frepack-arrays
 @cindex Repacking arrays
-In some circumstances @command{gfortran} may pass assumed shape array
+In some circumstances GNU Fortran may pass assumed shape array
 sections via a descriptor describing a discontiguous area of memory.
 This option adds code to the function prologue to repack the data into
 a contiguous block at runtime.
@@ -865,25 +865,25 @@
 @item -fshort-enums
 This option is provided for interoperability with C code that was
 compiled with the @command{-fshort-enums} option.  It will make
-@command{gfortran} choose the smallest @code{INTEGER} kind a given
+GNU Fortran choose the smallest @code{INTEGER} kind a given
 enumerator set will fit in, and give all its enumerators this kind.
 @end table
 
 @xref{Code Gen Options,,Options for Code Generation Conventions,
 gcc,Using the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC)}, for information on more options
 offered by the GBE
-shared by @command{gfortran} @command{gcc} and other GNU compilers.
+shared by @command{gfortran}, @command{gcc}, and other GNU compilers.
 
 
 @c man end
 
 @node Environment Variables
-@section Environment Variables Affecting GNU Fortran
+@section Environment Variables Affecting @command{gfortran}
 @cindex environment variables
 
 @c man begin ENVIRONMENT
 
-GNU Fortran 95 currently does not make use of any environment
+The @command{gfortran} compiler currently does not make use of any environment
 variables to control its operation above and beyond those
 that affect the operation of @command{gcc}.
 
@@ -892,5 +892,5 @@
 variables.
 
 @xref{Runtime}, for environment variables that affect the
-run-time behavior of @command{gfortran} programs.
+run-time behavior of programs compiled with GNU Fortran.
 @c man end
Index: intrinsic.texi
===================================================================
--- intrinsic.texi	(revision 117359)
+++ intrinsic.texi	(working copy)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 @ignore
 Copyright (C) 2005, 2006
 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-This is part of the GFORTRAN manual.   
+This is part of the GNU Fortran manual.   
 For copying conditions, see the file gfortran.texi.
 
 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
@@ -247,7 +247,7 @@
 @node Introduction
 @section Introduction to intrinsic procedures
 
-Gfortran provides a rich set of intrinsic procedures that includes all
+GNU Fortran provides a rich set of intrinsic procedures that includes all
 the intrinsic procedures required by the Fortran 95 standard, a set of
 intrinsic procedures for backwards compatibility with Gnu Fortran 77
 (i.e., @command{g77}), and a small selection of intrinsic procedures
@@ -256,7 +256,7 @@
 is unintentional and the standard(s) should be considered authoritative.
 
 The enumeration of the @code{KIND} type parameter is processor defined in
-the Fortran 95 standard.  Gfortran defines the default integer type and
+the Fortran 95 standard.  GNU Fortran defines the default integer type and
 default real type by @code{INTEGER(KIND=4)} and @code{REAL(KIND=4)},
 respectively.  The standard mandates that both data types shall have
 another kind, which have more precision.  On typical target architectures
@@ -272,7 +272,7 @@
 This document follows the convention used in the Fortran 95 standard,
 and denotes such arguments by square brackets.
 
-@command{Gfortran} offers the @option{-std=f95} and @option{-std=gnu} options,
+GNU Fortran offers the @option{-std=f95} and @option{-std=gnu} options,
 which can be used to restrict the set of intrinsic procedures to a 
 given standard.  By default, @command{gfortran} sets the @option{-std=gnu}
 option, and so all intrinsic procedures described here are accepted.  There
@@ -386,7 +386,7 @@
 @findex @code{ACCESS} 
 @cindex file system functions
 
-Not yet implemented in gfortran.
+Not yet implemented in GNU Fortran.
 
 @table @asis
 @item @emph{Description}:
@@ -1867,7 +1867,7 @@
 @findex @code{CHMOD} 
 @cindex file system functions
 
-Not yet implemented in gfortran.
+Not yet implemented in GNU Fortran.
 
 @table @asis
 @item @emph{Description}:
@@ -3343,7 +3343,7 @@
 (formatted or unformatted) I/O on the same unit; the results are unpredictable.
 
 This intrinsic routine is provided for backwards compatibility with 
-GNU Fortran 77.  @command{Gfortran} provides the Fortran 2003 Stream facility.
+@command{g77}.  GNU Fortran provides the Fortran 2003 Stream facility.
 Programmers should consider the use of new stream IO feature in new code 
 for future portability. See also @ref{Fortran 2003 status}.
 
@@ -3398,7 +3398,7 @@
 unformatted) I/O on the same unit; the results are unpredictable.
 
 This intrinsic routine is provided for backwards compatibility with 
-GNU Fortran 77.  @command{Gfortran} provides the Fortran 2003 Stream facility.
+@command{g77}.  GNU Fortran provides the Fortran 2003 Stream facility.
 Programmers should consider the use of new stream IO feature in new code 
 for future portability. See also @ref{Fortran 2003 status}.
 
@@ -3571,7 +3571,7 @@
 (formatted or unformatted) I/O on the same unit; the results are unpredictable.
 
 This intrinsic routine is provided for backwards compatibility with 
-GNU Fortran 77.  @command{Gfortran} provides the Fortran 2003 Stream facility.
+@command{g77}.  GNU Fortran provides the Fortran 2003 Stream facility.
 Programmers should consider the use of new stream IO feature in new code 
 for future portability. See also @ref{Fortran 2003 status}.
 
@@ -3621,7 +3621,7 @@
 (formatted or unformatted) I/O on the same unit; the results are unpredictable.
 
 This intrinsic routine is provided for backwards compatibility with 
-GNU Fortran 77.  @command{Gfortran} provides the Fortran 2003 Stream facility.
+@command{g77}.  GNU Fortran provides the Fortran 2003 Stream facility.
 Programmers should consider the use of new stream IO feature in new code 
 for future portability. See also @ref{Fortran 2003 status}.
 
@@ -3713,7 +3713,7 @@
 @item @emph{Description}:
 Frees memory previously allocated by @code{MALLOC()}. The @code{FREE}
 intrinsic is an extension intended to be used with Cray pointers, and is
-provided in @command{gfortran} to allow user to compile legacy code. For
+provided in GNU Fortran to allow user to compile legacy code. For
 new code using Fortran 95 pointers, the memory de-allocation intrinsic is
 @code{DEALLOCATE}.
 
@@ -3773,7 +3773,7 @@
 @findex @code{FSEEK} 
 @cindex file system functions
 
-Not yet implemented in gfortran.
+Not yet implemented in GNU Fortran.
 
 @table @asis
 @item @emph{Description}:
@@ -4111,7 +4111,7 @@
 @findex @code{GMTIME} 
 @cindex time function
 
-Not yet implemented in gfortran.
+Not yet implemented in GNU Fortran.
 
 @table @asis
 @item @emph{Description}:
@@ -5280,7 +5280,7 @@
 @findex @code{LSHIFT} 
 @cindex bit manipulation
 
-Not yet implemented in gfortran.
+Not yet implemented in GNU Fortran.
 
 @table @asis
 @item @emph{Description}:
@@ -5308,7 +5308,7 @@
 @findex @code{LTIME} 
 @cindex time function
 
-Not yet implemented in gfortran.
+Not yet implemented in GNU Fortran.
 
 @table @asis
 @item @emph{Description}:
@@ -5341,7 +5341,7 @@
 @code{MALLOC(SIZE)} allocates @var{SIZE} bytes of dynamic memory and
 returns the address of the allocated memory. The @code{MALLOC} intrinsic
 is an extension intended to be used with Cray pointers, and is provided
-in @command{gfortran} to allow user to compile legacy code. For new code
+in GNU Fortran to allow the user to compile legacy code. For new code
 using Fortran 95 pointers, the memory allocation intrinsic is
 @code{ALLOCATE}.
 
@@ -6549,7 +6549,7 @@
 @findex @code{RSHIFT} 
 @cindex bit manipulation
 
-Not yet implemented in gfortran.
+Not yet implemented in GNU Fortran.
 
 @table @asis
 @item @emph{Description}:
@@ -7273,7 +7273,7 @@
 The Fortran 2003 standard specifies the intrinsic @code{RANDOM_SEED} to
 initialize the pseudo-random numbers generator and @code{RANDOM_NUMBER}
 to generate pseudo-random numbers. Please note that in
-@command{gfortran}, these two sets of intrinsics (@code{RAND},
+GNU Fortran, these two sets of intrinsics (@code{RAND},
 @code{IRAND} and @code{SRAND} on the one hand, @code{RANDOM_NUMBER} and
 @code{RANDOM_SEED} on the other hand) access two independent
 pseudo-random number generators.

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