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[using gcc book] ch5.6 referring to a type with typeof


In section 5.6, we have the following paragraph:

    The reason for using names that start with underscores for
    the local variables is to avoid conflicts with variable names
    that occur within the expressions that are substituted for
    'a' and 'b'. Eventually we hope to design a new form of
    declaration syntax that allows you to declare variables whose
    scopes start only after their initializers; this will be a
    more reliable way to prevent such conflicts.

Stilted. I was considering a rewrite along these lines:

    Names that start with underscores for the local variables are
    used to avoid conflicts with variable names occurring within
    the expressions that are substituted for 'a' and 'b'.  There
    are hopes to eventually design a new form of declaration
    syntax that allows you to declare variables whose scopes
    start only after their initializers. This will be a more
    reliable way to prevent such conflicts.

I feel this reads a little more easily.

It occurs to me however that much of what is being said here is more or
less speculation about where GCC is going, and for all I know GCC dealt
with this problem and moved on a long time ago, leaving the documentation
behind for poor defenseless Perl hackers like me to muddle through :)

Would it be fair to comment this out, or chop it down, or should it stay
as is -- hopefully with the revised version?

If anyone wants to read this in context, a fairly recent PDF snapshot is
available at <http://devers.homeip.net:8080/gccbook/edited/gcc_chd.pdf>.
My change isn't in the version there, at least as of this writing, but I
plan to do an update on that file once I finish through the last batch of
edits I've got on the desk here.

Thanks again


-- 
Chris Devers      cdevers@pobox.com
http://devers.homeip.net:8080/blog/

acuracy, n.
An absence of erors. "The computer offers both speed and acuracy, but
the greatest of these is acuracy." (Anon. doctoral thesis on
automation, 1980).

    -- from _The Computer Contradictionary_, Stan Kelly-Bootle, 1995


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